Ways of seeing

1 Day Workshop

What does creativity have to do with the way we look at the world? Our eyes are a window through which we see and perceive life, and through which others can see and perceive us. The world around is talking to us almost non-stop through social media, films, advertisement and so on. Influenced by our culture, skills and knowledge, as well as natural filtration mechanisms (all of which are also necessary and useful) often we establish a particular perspective or a certain way of interpreting reality that impede us creatively, that don’t allow us to see things, people or situations in a fresh way.

How to revive and free our seeing abilities is the question at the center of this workshop. We will play with fixed ways and interpretations we inherit from our culture, learn from the work of other artists, refresh our perspectives, we will practice seeing differently and perceiving more of the world around. Tools we use on the way are looking and looking again, noticing, collecting, sensing, drawing, perceiving, painting, and others. Rooted, as we are, in embodied culture. 

This workshop is a part of Creativity takes Courage series. 

What will happen

During the workshop we will guide you through a journey that will begin with exploration of how vision is used in our society,  and how it frequently becomes a tool to strip things of multiple meanings they can have, a medium of comparison, or an instrument of convincing people to buy stuff they may or may not need. We will also do some experiments to see how natural filtration mechanisms of our eyes work. The established habits, whether cultural or natural, are also useful of course, so we don’t want to get rid of them. What we want is to be able to choose when to rely on them and when to experience something new. Our guides and tools in the process consist of a variety of artistic seeing approaches, practices and techniques, rooted in embodied culture. This means exploring seeing as a more holistic experience, acquired through a collaboration of multiple senses. Perception happens on many levels, looking is one part of it, as we are not cameras just snapping pictures, our whole being is involved in the act of perception.

We will also dive into some examples from the history of art as well as contemporary practices of visual creation, to explore how other artists approach seeing visible and invisible realities, and spend a moment in the contemplative practice of slow art. During the workshop you will also create your own toolbox of techniques and practices, that will stay with you long after this workshop is over, to remind you to see things new, to be consciously creative, to work on the self and material together in an alchemy of sympathetic resonance. 


Mentors for this workshop

Diego Mallo is a contributor to Foresta Collective, a visual artist and illustrator working in editorial, press, commercial and children’s illustration. He is an associate teacher of "Color theory and research" at the Bachelor's degree in Graphic Design at the LCI Barcelona. Interdisciplinary experimentation defines his style, from naturalistic drawing to visual poetry, photo illustration and paper sculptures.

Sabina Enéa Téari is the founder of Foresta Collective. Her work is dedicated to personal and global sustainability in a broader sense and the connection between the two. She works internationally designing and facilitating learning experiences, cultural projects, interdisciplinary events, and individual consultations in the context of integral sustainability, collaborative creativity and embodied culture.  

Next date: 9th March 10-18h (with lunch break)

Price: 85 eur (including materials)
Not being an oficial institution we do not have a system of scholarships, however we want everyone who wants to participate in our learning experiences to be able to participate. If your income doesn’t allow you to pay this price for the workshop but you would really like to join us, please write us anyway, tell us why, and we’ll see what we can do.

Cover image by Diego Mallo